Power Boards - FAQ

General

For the Super AV Powerboard, it means the Powerboard is plugged into a wall socket and the wall switch is ON.

For the Simple IT Powerboard, it means that the Powerboard is plugged into the wall, the wall switch is ON and the appliance connected to the "Master" socket is either ON or in a "Low Power Mode".
Standby, Off, SLEEP, or Hibernate are often everyday words used to explain what EP describes collectively as Low Power Modes. They typically describe times when the appliance is drawing power but is not actively being utilised by the user.
Standby Power is typically a term that refers to power consumed by appliances when they are not completely On and in use yet also not completely Off. Typical examples are when the TV is turned off at the remote control but not at the TV or the wall socket. You may have noticed a red light on your TV, this typically indicates a TV is in Standby.
With the Powerboard for Computers you can plug your computer and all the associated appliances you use with your computer into the device (Usually this is your printer, monitor, speakers, external hard drives, etc.)

With the Powerboard for TV/AV you can plug your TV and all the associated appliances you use with your TV into the device (Usually this is your DVD player, games console, set top box, home entertainment systems, speakers, stereo  surround sound etc.)

With both the Computer and AV/TV Powerboard you can plug other appliances like lights, radios, and clocks etc. that are close to your computer or TV/AV system into the Powerboard. They do not have to be a typical computer or TV/AV add-on like those mentioned above. Just remember, that if you plug these devices into the Slave sockets they will only be available for use when the TV or Computer ‘Master’ devices are in a high power mode (like  ON).

For more information on which appliance should be plugged into which socket, refer to the FAQ, "How do I decide what appliances to plug into which sockets?"
Normal Socket– Plug peripheral computer or TV/AV appliances in here that you want to remain connected to mains power at all times.

In an AV/TV environment this can apply to Pay TV units, DVD and/or Video Recorders on which you pre-program recordings ahead of time, TiVo on which you pre-program the recording at specific times of future TV programs, or any other appliance relying on a continuous timer or clock.

NOTE: Some projectors have a step down process when they are turned off which allows the projectors lights to cool gradually after use. These appliances should be plugged into the normal socket.

In a Computing environment some people may want their computer to remain connected to the internet even when they are not using their computer and may plug their modem into the Normal socket.

Master Socket – For an AV/TV Powerboard, plug your TV into the Master socket. When your TV is in Low Power Mode the powerboard will use this as a signal to disconnect mains power from the TV Master and all the Slave appliances.

For a Computer Powerboard, plug your Computer in here. When the Computer is in a low power mode (OFF, or SLEEP, or HIBERNATE are common examples) the device will disconnect mains power from the Slave appliances.

Note: a computer plugged into the Master socket is never disconnected from mains power so it can continue to function as it normally would in low power modes (like SLEEP or HIBERNATE). There is no possibility of lost work in open work files as a result of using the device.

Slaves Socket –Plug other peripheral computer or TV/AV appliances in here.

In an AV/TV environment, when the TV Master is turned into a low power mode (OFF or STANDBY are often common examples) the device will disconnect mains power to these Slave appliances. (Usually this is your DVD player, games console, set top box, home entertainment systems, speakers, stereo surround sound etc.).

In a computer environment, when the Computer Master is in a low power mode (OFF, SLEEP or HIBERNATE are often common examples) the device will disconnect mains power to these Slave appliances. (Usually this is your printer, monitor, speakers, external hard drives, etc.)
Turn the TV or Computer into a high power mode, typically this is the On mode. Then turn On your ‘Slave’ appliance. As long as the TV or Computer ‘Master’ appliances are On, you can use the ‘Slave’ appliance. 

In some isolated instances, where you use a ‘Slave’ appliance for extended periods, without also wanting to have the ‘Master’ appliance on at the same time, you may find you can optimise energy savings by having this appliance plugged into the ‘Normal’ socket rather than the ‘Slave’ socket.

For example; when you listen to a radio for extended periods when you don’t have the TV On, it may be better for this radio to be plugged into a ‘Normal’ socket rather than a ‘Slave’ socket.
There are several potential reasonsYour TV has a Step Down mode that is not a low power mode. Sometimes these Step Down modes are referred to as Active Standby or Quick Start. Generally, these modes last for a few minutes at most. After a while most TVs then adopt a genuine low power mode, sometimes called Passive Standby, or simply Standby. 120 seconds (2 minutes) after this low power mode is established the device will disconnect mains electricity from the "slaves".

Your computer is charging the battery. The device generally maintains an electrical supply to the Computer ‘Master’ and its ‘Slaves’ whilst the battery is charging. This electrical supply can even be maintained when the computer is OFF, in SLEEP or in HIBERNATE. After the battery is fully charged the computer will typically adopt a low power mode. Within 120 seconds (2 minutes) of this the device will disconnect mains electricity from the ‘Slaves’

If you have a Super AV ESP and you have unplugged the ESP from the wall, or turned it off at the socket at the wall for more than 1 minute, it is possible you will need to re-run the ‘Initial Set-Up’ process to reset the powerboard. It is possible but unlikely that a power surge, overload or blackout situation could also mean you have to re-run the ‘Initial Set-Up’ process to reset the powerboard.

If you have a Super AV ESP and you have significantly altered the Power Saving Settings on your TV, you may need to re-run the ‘Initial Set-Up’ process to reset the powerboard.

If you have altered the Power Saving setting of your computer it may feel as if it takes a longer or shorter period to shut down the ‘Slaves’ than previously. For example; An ESP with a computer in its ‘Master’ socket that is set to enter a low power mode (like SLEEP) 5 minutes after you leave it Idle will shut down the ‘Slave’ appliances before an ESP whose ‘Master’ computer is set to enter SLEEP 30 minutes after it is left Idle.
Emerald Planet recommends not to add a double adaptor and additional powerboards to the Energy Saving Power Board. EP recommends that you use an external socket to accommodate double adaptors and additional powerboards etc.
1) Make sure the ESP is turned on at the wall socket.

2) Make sure the devices are plugged firmly into the correct sockets of the ESP.

3) Make sure there is not a fuse blown or there is not a blackout. Check other appliances in nearby sockets and if necessary the fuse box for your house.

4) Check that the Master (TV or Computer) is in a high power mode (like On). The slave will only be able to be switched on if the Master is also On.

5) If the ‘Slave’ appliance has a remote control, make sure you are pointing it directly at the appliance. Check the batteries on your remote control – are they in the right way? Are they too old?

6) Try turning the appliance On with the On/Off button on the appliance itself rather than with the remote. If this works it is likely there is a problem with your remote control.

7) Take the ‘Slave’ appliance out of the ESP and try it in a different standalone socket. If you can’t turn it On there it is likely to be a problem with your appliance. Not the ESP. Refer to your slave appliance instructions.

8) If nothing else works, try turning off all the appliances and unplugging them from the ESP. Then turn off the ESP from the wall and unplug it. Wait for three minutes and then re-plug in all appliances as per the ESP’s instructions and try again.

9) Call the installation company that installed the ESP and ask for help. If it is an installation problem they will help you. Otherwise they may refer you to Emerald Planet.
1) Make sure the ESP is turned on at the wall socket.

2) Make sure the devices are plugged firmly into the correct sockets of the ESP.

3) Make sure there is not a fuse blown or there is a blackout. Check other appliances in nearby sockets and if necessary the fuse box for your house.

4) With the AV Energy Saving Powerboards, you must reconnect electricity to the ESP using a remote control device before you can turn your TV and the ‘Slaves’ On. If you try and turn on the TV or ‘Slaves’ on at a ‘hard’ on/off button on the device without having first activated the ESP with an infra-red remote control message neither the TV or ‘Slaves’ will come on.

5) If it’s an AV Energy Saving Powerboards check that the Infra-red receiver of the device (a small plastic box connected to the ESP by a thin wire – the box will either be clear or red and is smaller than a matchbox) is in direct line of sight to where you are pointing the remote control.
The ESP disconnects the TV from mains electricity from time to time a part of its normal operation. If the TV does not have an internal battery to run the clock it will lose time whenever this happens. This will also apply to any products plugged into the ESP’s ‘Slave’ sockets.
Conservative estimates of energy savings suggest the Simple IT product saves 360 kwH of electricity over its lifetime. This translates to $72 at a conservative electricity tariff of $0.20 a kwH over the period and approximately 1 tonne of carbon emissions saved.

The same conservative estimates of energy savings of the Simple AV product suggests it will save 500 kwH of electricity over its lifetime. This translates to $100 at a conservative electricity tariff of $0.20 a kwH over the period and 1 tonne of carbon emissions saved.

The Super AV product is undergoing a field trial currently to ascertain its savings. At this stage we anticipate that it will show that the product will save 2,000 kwH of electricity over its lifetime. This translates to $400 at a conservative electricity tariff of $0.20 a kwH over the period and 4 tonnes of carbon emissions saved.

Detailed workings and reference to analysis in government papers can be provided to support these figures.

You can plug a double adaptor or powerboard (choose a modern high quality one with its own overload protector) into the ESP’s ‘Normal’ socket and then put more than one appliance into this powerboard. All the appliances plugged into the ‘Normal’ socket, either directly or indirectly through a double adaptor or powerboard will remain connected to mains electricity at all times.
Yes, the ESP does conserve electricity but it is always less than 1 Watt. This is significantly less than the energy it saves and all estimates of energy, money and carbon emission savings in this FAQ page take account of the power use of the ESP itself.
Call the Company that installed the product. It is most likely that the problem is an installation problem. If they cannot help you they may refer you to Emerald Planet.

AV Energy Saving Powerboard Specific – (TV) 

When you come to use your TV Master or the associated Slave appliances simply pick up the TV Remote Control and click once. The Powerboard will reconnect mains power to the TV Master and the Slave appliances. Generally the red light on most appliances will come on and they will be in Standby mode. Then click the TV remote a second time if necessary and for best results within 5 seconds, to turn the TV from Standby into On.
Once you have finished watching the TV, use the remote to power down the TV into a low power mode, like Standby. After about 60 seconds the Powerboard will disconnect power from the TV Master and all the Slave appliances.
 With the Powerboard for TV/AV you can plug your TV and all the associated appliances you use with your TV into the device (Usually this is your DVD player, games console, set top box, home entertainment systems, speakers, stereo surround sound etc.)

With both the Computer and AV/TV Powerboard you can plug other appliances like lights, radios, and clocks etc. that are close to your computer or TV/AV system into the Powerboard. They do not have to be a typical computer or TV/AV add-on like those mentioned above. Just remember, that if you plug these devices into the Slave sockets they will only be available for use when the TV or Computer ‘Master’ devices are in a high power mode (like ON).

For more information on which appliance should be plugged into which socket, refer to the FAQ, How do I decide what appliances to plug into which sockets?
See the question, ‘I can’t get the Energy Saving Powerboard to reconnect mains electricity? What should I do?’
See the question, ‘I can’t get the Energy Saving Powerboard to reconnect mains electricity? What should I do?’
 1) Make sure you are pointing the Remote Control at the TV and that the ESP infra-red remote control sensor (small red or clear box attached to the AV ESP with a thin cable) is well attached and in direct sight of the remote control

2) Check the batteries on your remote control – are they in the right way? Are they too old?

3) Try turning the TV off with the ‘hard’ button on the TV. If this works it is likely there is a problem with your remote control.

4) Refer to your TV instructions
 1) Ensure you have waited a full 120 seconds (2 minutes) after the TV has entered a low power mode for the TV and ‘Slaves’ to be disconnected.

2) If you notice that the disconnection takes place but it takes materially longer than 120 seconds (2 minutes) it is likely your TV may have a Step Down, Quick Start or Active Standby mode that is not a true low power state.

Check your TV’s instruction manuals to see if your TV has these modes and what purpose they serve for your TV. If these features are not appealing or useful you will find you maximise your energy savings by shortening, turning down or turning off these features.

Generally, these modes last for a few minutes at most. After a while most TVs then adopt a genuine low power mode, sometimes called Passive Standby, or simply Standby. 120 seconds (2 minutes) after this low power mode is established the device will disconnect mains electricity from the slaves.

 3) If you have a Super AV ESP it is possible the powerboard may need to be run through the ‘Initial Set-Up’ process again. Refer to the original instructions on the packaging for guidance on how to re-run the ‘Initial Set-Up’

4) If nothing else works, try turning off all the appliances and unplugging them from the ESP. Then turn off the ESP from the wall and unplug it. Wait for three minutes and then re-plug in all appliances as per the ESP’s instructions and try again.

5) Call the installation company that installed the ESP and ask for help. If it is an installation problem they will help you. Otherwise they may refer you to Emerald Planet.
 Sometimes you may notice AV appliances come On when you are not expecting it. In the rare instances when this occurs it is because the ESP has sensed a remote control message from a remote other than the TV remote.

Provided you do not then actually turn the TV On, after approximately 30 seconds the ESP will assume that you do not want the TV or its ‘Slaves’ on and will disconnect mains electricity from these appliances. This is not a significant problem and the ESP has passed independent laboratory tests and/or field trials that demonstrate this does not adversely affect the ESP’s functionality or energy saving effectiveness.
Yes. You can plug other appliances like lights, radios, clocks etc that are close to your TV into the Powerboard. They do not have to be a typical TV/AV add-on like those mentioned above. Just remember, that if you plug these devices into the Slave sockets they will only be available for use when the TV is in high power modes like ON. Not when the TV is in low power modes like OFF or in STANDBY.
Many people with Foxtel units use these units to pre-programme the recording of TV shows ahead of time and to the Foxtel devices Hard Drive. If this is how you use your Foxtel we recommend you plug the Foxtel unit into the Normal socket of the Powerboard.
 It depends on how you use your appliance?

If you pre-programme the recording of TV shows ahead of time to the DVD Recorders Hard Drive or to a DVD or onto a Video cassette, you should plug the appliance into the Powerboard’s ‘Normal’ socket. This is because you do not want power to be disconnected from this device as this would mean the pre-programming would be lost and you would not record the show.

If you do not pre-programme the recording of TV shows or you only record shows as you are watching them, you can plug these devices into one of the Powerboard’s ‘Slave’ sockets.
 Appliances which have a timer or a pre-programme function that you rely on when you use the appliance may not be suitable to be plugged into the Slave sockets. This is because you do not want power to be disconnected from this device as this would mean the pre-programming would be lost and the timer or clock would not keep time correctly as a result of periodically being disconnected from mains power.

If you do not rely on the timer, clock or pre-programme functions of one of these devices you may still be able plug it into the Slave sockets. For example, if you have a DVD recorder but you only ever use it to watch rented DVDs or tape shows you are actually watching at the same time then you do not rely on the devices timer and pre-programme function and the appliance can be plugged into a ‘Slave’ socket.
 It depends how you use the inbuilt HD recorder.

If you pre-programme the recording of TV shows ahead of time to the TV’s HD the Powerboard may not work for you as it will disconnect mains power from the TV whenever the TV goes into STANDBY and you may lose the pre-programming and the TV show will not be recorded.

The problem can be overcome if you are willing to forgo the ability to pre-programme or you utilise another separate appliance like a standalone HD recorder or Foxtel with inbuilt HD recorder that is plugged into the ‘Normal’ socket of the Powerboard to do all your pre-programmed recording. Then you can use the standalone HD recorder or the Foxtel unit to pre-programme the recording of TV shows and it does not matter if the TV is disconnected from mains electricity from time to time.

If you do not pre-programme the recording of TV shows onto your TV’s HD, or you only record shows as you are watching them, you should be able to plug a TV with an HD recorder into the ‘Master’ socket of the Powerboard and the device will work as intended.
Some detailed definitions of Active and Passive Standby can be found at the US Energy Star website. Passive Standby typically refers to the mode a TV is in when it is still connected to mains power but it is not in use, it is drawing its lowest level of power, but it is not completely Off. Typically this state is signified by a red light on the TV being illuminated.

Active Standby is a term that is used in different ways and is hard often to apply to TVs. A clear example of Active Standby would be when a DVD is On (not Off or in Standby) but is idle. By idle, it is meant that no-one is using the DVD to record or watch DVDs.

Some TVs have a ‘Step Down’ mode which is power mode typically somewhere between On and Standby. Typically a TV with a ‘Step Down’ state enters this mode for an average of about 14 seconds after someone has finished watching it but before it enters Passive Standby. Sometimes this Step Down is labelled Active Standby.
|Some TVs have a Blue Screen or Black Screen mode. Typically this is only found in Plasma TVs and is generally a mode designed to prolong the life and quality of the screen itself. This may or may not be a lower energy state than the TV being On. However, it is sometimes referred to as being synonymous with Active Standby.

Typically, the presence of a Blue Screen, Black Screen, Step Down or Active Standby in your TV will not affect the effectiveness of the Powerboard. In some isolated instance you may notice the Powerboard doesn’t disconnect ‘Slaves’ until after a Step Down or similar mode is completed and the TV enters a conventional low power mode like Passive Standby.
 Some TVs have a Blue Screen or Black Screen mode. Typically this is only found in Plasma TVs and is generally a mode designed to prolong the life and quality of the screen itself. This may or may not be a lower energy state than the TV being On. Sometimes Blue and Black Screen modes are referred to as Standby modes.

Typically, the presence of a Blue Screen or Black Screen will not impede the suitability of the product with your TV. The Powerboard has been tested to establish that it can successfully manage Blue Screen and Black Screen states without problems by an independent test laboratory accredited by the National Association of testing Authorities and accredited to test Standby Power.

IT Energy Saving Powerboard Specific – (Computers)

Yes. You can plug other appliances like lights, radios, and clocks etc. that are close to your computer into the Powerboard. They do not have to be a typical computer add-on like those mentioned above. Just remember, that if you plug these devices into the Slave sockets they will only be available for use when the Computer is in a high power mode like ON and not in low power modes like SLEEP or HIBERNATE.
 With the Powerboard for Computers you can plug your computer and all the associated appliances you use with your computer into the device (Usually this is your printer, monitor, speakers, external hard drives, etc.)

With both the Computer and AV/TV Powerboard you can plug other appliances like lights, radios, and clocks etc. that are close to your computer or TV/AV system into the Powerboard. They do not have to be a typical computer or TV/AV add-on like those mentioned above. Just remember, that if you plug these devices into the Slave sockets they will only be available for use when the TV or Computer ‘Master’ devices are in a high power mode (like ON).

For more information on which appliance should be plugged into which socket, refer to the FAQ, How do I decide what appliances to plug into which sockets?
When you come to use your computer or its associated slave appliances after the computer has been in a low power mode (like Off, or Sleep, or Hibernate), turn On or wake up the computer as you normally would. As soon as the computer begins to turn On or wake up from Standby, the associated Slave appliances will be reconnected to the power and be in either Standby or On modes. Then you can use the computer and its slaves as you normally would.
 One of three ways;

a) Allow the computer to automatically enter a low power mode like Sleep, depending on your settings in your computer’s power saving modes this occurs after a period where there is no active use of the computer.

b) Force the computer into a low power mode like (Sleep or Hibernate are often common examples). Often this is achieved by clicking on the Windows icon in the extreme bottom left corner of the screen, then choosing ‘Shut down’ and then ‘Sleep.’ The key strokes to force a computer into sleep may vary between Macintosh and Windows operating systems and between different versions of operating system software. Consult your computer’s instructions for guidance.

c) Turn the computer completely off.

Once you action either of the above steps the Powerboard will typically disconnect power from all the associated Slave appliances.Note: If you are using the Powerboard with a laptop computer and the battery is not fully charged the Slave appliances will only be switched off after the battery is completely charged. Sometimes this can take more than an hour. If you want the slaves to be disconnected earlier you can remove the battery from the back of the computer but be sure not to do this whilst you have open files on your laptop and it is also not plugged in or you will lose your work.
 1) Check that the computer has entered a low power mode, like SLEEP, HIBERNATE or Off. If not, then the ‘Slaves’ are not meant to be disconnected from mains electricity.

2) If the computer is in a low power mode like SLEEP, HIBERNATE or Off and the Slaves are still not turning off after about 120 seconds (2 minutes), check that the battery of the computer is not being charged. Only laptops will have batteries.

If the battery is charging the ‘Slaves’ will only turn off once the battery is completely charged. Typically a battery will charge in about 45 minutes but in isolated instances it can take longer. The status of the battery can usually be checked by right clicking a battery icon in the bottom left hand corner of your screen.

3) Check the Power saving settings on your computer. If the computer is configured so that it does not enter SLEEP or HIBERNATE for a long time, or at all, the ‘Slaves’ may not be disconnected from mains electricity for a long time, or at all.

Typical default setting for a laptop using battery power is to go to SLEEP after 15 minutes of not being actively used. The default setting is 30 minutes when the computer is plugged in. You can increase the energy saving efficiency of your Computer ‘Master’ and ‘Slaves’ by reducing these time frames.

Some Apple computers can have a tendency to wake the computer from SLEEP when a peripheral appliance is disconnected from mains electricity. If the Power Settings on the Apple is not adjusted this can impact the effectiveness of the ESP. There is a significant amount of detail in Apple on-line support materials and chat rooms to assist you to reconfigure your settings if you experience this problem.

4) If nothing else works, try turning off all the appliances and unplugging them from the ESP. Then turn off the ESP from the wall and unplug it. Wait for three minutes and then re-plug in all appliances as per the ESP’s instructions and try again. 5) Call the installation company that installed the ESP and ask for help. If it is an installation problem they will help you. Otherwise they may refer you to Emerald Planet.
It is possible with some Apple computers sometimes you may notice AV appliances come On when you are not expecting it. Some Apple computers can have a tendency to wake the computer from SLEEP when a peripheral appliance is disconnected from mains electricity. If the Power Settings on the Apple is not adjusted this can impact the effectiveness of the ESP. There is a significant amount of detail in Apple on-line support materials and chat rooms to assist you to reconfigure your settings if you experience this problem.
 This is a matter of personal preference. However, typically, the shorter you set the timeframes for the computer to enter low power modes like SLEEP or HIBERNATE the more effective the ESP will be in saving energy. The Power Saving settings or Power Options can most often be accessed by right clicking on the battery icon in the bottom right corner of the screen.

Refer to your Operating System Software Help Guides for more assistance.
 The IT ESP is designed to recognise when a laptop is charging its battery. Regardless of whether the laptop is Off, in SLEEP or in HIBERNATE. The ESP will not disconnect mains electricity when a battery is being charged so your battery charge process will not be interrupted.

Once the battery charge is complete, and the computer is in a low power mode like SLEEP, HIBERNATE or OFF the Powerboard will disconnect mains electricity from the ‘Slave’ appliances.
Yes. The IT Powerboard has been tested on both Apple and Windows, PC Desktops and laptops with Apple and Windows, PC based operating systems.
The IT Powerboard does not interact or rely on any computer software, either on the computer or on any of the ‘Slave’ appliances.

Safety

The product has been tested in accordance with all relevant Australian Safety Standards for a device of its type. In particular, it has been tested to Standard AS/NZS 3197:2005 inc. A1:2007 for portable electrical control or conditioning devices. You can find the product registered with the appropriate Australian authorities for electrical safety in your State.
 The product has been tested in accordance with all relevant Australian Safety Standards for a device of its type. In particular, it has been tested to Standard AS/NZS 3197:2005 inc. A1:2007 for portable electrical control or conditioning devices. You can find the product registered with the appropriate Australian authorities for electrical safety in your State.

The product has also been tested to additional stringent requirements by independent third parties who are members of the National Association of Testing Authorities (NATA) and who are accredited in the measurement of Standby Power. The additional stringent requirements were specified by the Victorian Government in the Victorian Energy Efficiency Target Act and its associated Regulations, Guidelines and Explanatory notes.

The EP 4357 Super AV (RCIR) product was also subjected to a field trial where its performance and suitability was tested against a sample of Australian houses.

To satisfy yourself that the product is compatible with your particular appliances you should refer to the instructional manuals of those appliances to ensure the ESP does not operate in a way that is detrimental to your appliances or incompatible with how you would like to use them.
 From time to time power surges can travel through the electrical system in your house. Lightning and electrical storms are often associated with this phenomenon. The Power Surge Protection in the Powerboard recognises power surges of a level that can damage appliances. Then the Powerboard is designed to help prevent these surges flowing through to your appliances.

If the Powerboard is ‘tripped’ by a Surge you may need to press the Reset button (the black button on the side of the Powerboard). If you have a Super AV ESP it is possible (but unlikely) that a Surge may mean you have to re-run your ESP through its ‘Initial Set-Up’ process.
  Overload occurs when too many appliances with too great a power load are plugged into the one socket. The Emerald Planet ESP recognises when the load of appliances plugged into its sockets is becoming excessive and it will trigger a switch that prevents power being supplied.

If the Powerboard is ‘tripped’ by an overload you may need to press the Reset button (the black button on the side of the Powerboard). If you have a Super AV ESP it is possible (but unlikely) that an overload may mean you have to re-run your ESP through its ‘Initial Set-Up’ process.
          

Emerald Planet has been working at the forefront of the environmental market since 2006. Emerald Planet was originally founded with the vision to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by utilising energy efficient products. Emerald Planet was involved with the NSW greenhouse Gas Abatement scheme (GGAS) from 2006 and partnered in the giveaway and installation of over 15 million CFL globes across NSW to December 2008.

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